EDITORIAL: Our promise to never censor the media

From a Christian lens, we whole-heartedly assert that Christ is to be represented in all things we do. That is why we are often reminded of 1 John 1:8, which says, “If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us.” Constantly striving to recall our own sinful nature, we hope to be made accountable for our actions. In that respect, we acknowledge an imperfect world. But we also remember a Savior in the midst of it all.

We are entirely aware of our responsibilities as faith-based journalists, and our role will never be taken lightly. Our promise is to only ever publish material acknowledging news as it stands – newsworthy, reliable and non-biased. The Huntingtonian simply serves as a platform to communicate what is already in place.  To do otherwise would be defamatory, and the student newspaper will never stoop so low.

To keep our promise, we must recall the importance of the First Amendment and the dangers of media censorship.

When censored, news is consumed by bias. To selectively present the news would be to reject reality and substitute it for an illusion. If the press fails to inform on all matters with accuracy, the reader is misled and oftentimes influenced by the selective information presented. Consider if the editors of 2 Samuel chose to censor the affair between King David and Bathsheba, or if the editors of Genesis chose to exclude chapter 19 where Lot had sex with his two daughters. If the Bible was censored, a critically important part of how we understand the world would be horribly misconstrued.

The truth is not always pretty. But it’s painfully necessary. As much as the “good news” is preached, take a look at how often Jesus (aka “The Truth”) points out the wrong and injustices of the world unapologetically. Are we not called to be like Christ?

Likewise, The Huntingtonian is here to present our readers with uncensored news. News that explores all sides — the good, the bad, the ugly.

Romans 12:2 says, “Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.” So read, test and discern the news we present. And thank our forefathers for the First Amendment. Through it, we can articulate fair and well-rounded opinions.

“Daredevil” unveils complexities of good v. evil

The fine line between right and wrong are often clearly etched into modern cinema. Audiences become satisfied with the age-long trope that “some men just want to watch the world burn.” That light always overcomes the darkness. That motivations for the wicked are always ill-founded. These absolutes dehumanize the Middle Easterner soldiers of “American Sniper” (2014) and unfairly antagonize anyone perceived as a threat to America.

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Avoid Online Trolls with These 7 Essential Tips

Considering the fact that I’m not up-to-date with political news as much as I’d like to be, it’s unfortunately the norm when my brain farts and I have no clue what’s going on with our government. I try to stay on top of it, I really do. Political darkness is a scary thing. Maybe that’s why a good friend of mine took it upon herself to fill me in over dinner one fine, Friday night.

“They’re killing babies!”

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Film will never see another original idea – “Insurgent” confirms

(Poster provided by movieposterdb.com)Forget the popularized dystopian worlds in recent cinema. Instead, imagine one in which authors attend the same dystopian-fiction writing convention. This isn’t difficult to believe when you analyze this phenomena of dystopian films and filter out the similarities. As if a writing template was copied and pasted across the board, not only are said films like “Insurgent,” “The Maze Runner” (2014) and “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” (2013) comparable in theme, they also parallel in plot twist – like, on a molecular level.

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Best Films of 2014 by Genre

Although a particularly slow year for film, awards like the Oscars remind us 2014 showcased some phenomenal films. Here is my list of the best films of 2014 by genre, including my film of the year.

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“Kingsman: The Secret Service” is the uncensored 007

When the gentlemen spy genre acquires an R-rating, an entirely new type of hero emerges. With director Matthew Vaughn’s imaginative screenplay style and expertise founded in former films like “X-Men: Days of Future Past,” he welcome into the cinematic universe somewhat of a James Bond/”Kick-Ass” hybrid in one of this year’s more satisfying surprises. Meet the Kingsman, the world’s most elite, secret spy agency.

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“Big Hero 6” advocates interracial friendships

Name the last animated Disney film you’ve seen promoting interracial couples. “The Princess and the Frog” (2009) and the sort-of-historically-based “Pocahontas” (1995) definitely come to mind. And, sure, Disney’s animated films have arguably advocated diverse relationships through extended metaphors, like a woman falling in love with a beast, a mermaid with a man and a woman with a frog. But is that all? Disguised advocacy?

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